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Understanding the Digital Customer Journey: Post 2 of 4 - Engagement

February 26, 2019

Engagement

Customer Journey Mapping

Customer Journey Mapping is a tool used to identify the digital paths that customers choose when engaging with your brand’s website–identifying both positive and negative interactions and emotions tied to their experience with your brand. In this blog series, our team is covering customer journey mapping, specifically detailing the journey a customer takes when interacting with a brand’s website.

Review of Phase I:  Motivations

Last week we covered phase one of Customer Journey Mapping:  Motivations, measured by acquisition tracking, which is understanding what drove a user to visit your site.  If you missed it, you can find it here. As we learned in the first phase of customer journey mapping we learned to recognize acquisition patterns. This helps us understand how users are finding your content,

Phase II:  Engagement

Next, it is critical for marketing to understand where and how customers are interacting with your content which is referred to as engagement.  Engagement, often regarded as a “fluff” metric is defined as an asset to an individual’s response to a piece of content. However, knowing where customers are engaging with your content and what brought them to that piece of content can help tell their story.

How to Measure Engagement

Analytical platforms show exactly which clickable items on a website received the most engagement. Pairing clicks with search terms and even page views can help to paint a picture of your customer’s journey on your website.

Using engagement metrics combined with a heatmap tool, which will be discussed in more detail in phase three, is critical to understanding the Engagement phase of the customer journey.

The Million Dollar Questions

Knowing the actions that a user takes on a website tells a story about their experience with your brand. Why did these users come to your website? Were they looking for a specific page or generally browsing? Did they find the answers they needed, or did they experience frustration and move on to a different website?  How these questions are answered will be addressed in next week’s blog post–Phase III, the User Experience.